SHOULD AUSTRALIA INCREASE ITS IMMIGRATION QUOTA? AUSSIES VOTE.

An Immigration to Australia study

About the study

Immigration to Australia commissioned a survey of an independent panel of 1002 Australians to discover whether Australians think their country is accepting enough international migrants in comparison to other countries.

Additionally, the survey also asked respondents which ‘categories’ Australia should be looking to fill with the help of overseas migrants.

These categories include:

  • Highly skilled overseas workers (doctors, engineers, etc.)
  • Overseas workers with more general skills (admin, retail sales, etc.)

  • Refugees

  • Hard to fill roles (fruit picking, mining, food preparation, etc.)

  • International students

  • Immediate family of Australian residents and citizens

  • Immediate family of migrants already in Australia awaiting residency

The survey respondents matched the geographical and population spread of the Australian population.

We had created a similar study regarding which is the best way to add more skillful employees to the Australian economy available here.

How many Aussies believe Australia should allow more international migrants?

Of the respondents, 36 per cent believe that Australia is not accepting enough migrants, especially in comparison to other major countries. Almost half (44%) of respondents believe that Australia is already accepting an adequate number of overseas migrants. This compares with only 20 per cent of respondents who believe that Australia should take in fewer migrants.

How many Aussies believe Australia should allow more international migrants?

Of the respondents, 36 per cent believe that Australia is not accepting enough migrants, especially in comparison to other major countries. Almost half (44%) of respondents believe that Australia is already accepting an adequate number of overseas migrants. This compares with only 20 per cent of respondents who believe that Australia should take in fewer migrants.

Do you think Australia should be allowing more international migrants?

By age.

Of the age groups, 18–34-year-olds are most likely to believe Australia should accept more migrants (50%). This is followed by:

  • 31% of 35–54-year-olds
  • 30% of respondents over 55.

Almost half (46%) of those aged 35-54 and over 55 are equally likely to believe the number of migrants accepted by Australia is adequate.

A quarter (25%) of respondents over the age of 55 believe that Australia should look towards taking in fewer migrants, followed by:

  • 23% of 35-54-year-olds
  • 11% of 18–34-year-olds.

Do you think Australia should be allowing more international migrants? (By age.)

By State.

Across the States, Victorians are most likely to believe that Australia should accept more migrants, at 41 per cent. This compares with:

  • 36% of NSW respondents
  • 35% of West Australians
  • 29% of Queenslanders
  • 29% of South Australians.

Half of all Queenslanders (50%) believe that Australia already accepts enough international migrants, at 50 per cent. This is followed by:

  • 47% of South Australians
  • 46% of West Australians
  • 45% of NSW respondents
  • 39% of Victorians.

Respondents in South Australia are most likely to want fewer migrants, with 24 per cent stating so. This is followed by:

  • 21% of Queenslanders
  • 20% of NSW respondents
  • 20% of Victorians
  • 19% of West Australians.

Do you think Australia should be allowing more international migrants? (By State.)

Which categories should Australia be looking to fill with the help of overseas immigrants?

More than 70 per cent (73%) of Australians believe that the country needs highly skilled workers such as doctors and engineers, followed by 49 per cent who believe hard to fill jobs such as fruit picking, mining and food preparation present good opportunities for migrants. Similarly, 47 per cent believe that Australia should be aiming to take in the immediate families of Australian residents. Other headline findings include:

  • 38% believe immigration numbers should be filled by refugees
  • 36% believe immigration numbers should be filled by the immediate family of migrants who have not yet secured permanent residency in Australia
  • 33% believe immigration numbers should be filled by overseas students
  • 32% believe immigration numbers should be filled by workers with more general skills

Do you think Australia should be allowing more international migrants?

By age.

Across the age groups, older respondents are most likely to believe that Australia should focus on taking in migrants who are highly skilled workers (81%) or filling unpopular jobs (51%).

Younger respondents (aged 18-34) more than any other age group, believe that immediate family of Australian citizens and residents (51%), refugees (48%), the immediate family of migrants who have not yet secured Australian residency (45%), overseas workers with more general skills (41%), and international students (40%), should be prioritised by our country.

What categories of international migrants should Australia focus on taking in? (By age.)

Respondents aged 35-54 were least likely to believe that immediate family of Australian residents (41%), refugees (34%), students (30%) immediate family of migrants who have not yet secured Australian residency (29%), and workers with more general skills (28%) should be prioritised by the country.

By State.

Respondents from Victoria are most likely to believe that refugees should be prioritised by Australia, at 45 per cent. This compares with only 28 per cent of West Australians.

Fifty-four (54) per cent of South Australians would like to see migrants fill ‘hard to fill’ roles such as fruit picking and mining. This compares with 46 per cent of Victorians.

The survey found 40 per cent of West Australians would like to see students filling immigration numbers, while only 27 per cent of Queenslanders believe the same.

What ‘categories’ of international migrants should Australia focus on taking in? (By State.)